Use our online home improvement tool to discover some easy ways you can make your home more dementia-friendly. Hover over the rooms on the house plan to see what you can do.

 

Items in your bathrooms should have contrasting features, so they are easily seen and used.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Install slip-resistant flooring or tiles
  2. Have a shower chair or a bath bench
  3. Install a walk-in shower base
  4. Install heat lamps to make the bathroom warm
  5. Have familiar and clear ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ cross head taps
  6. Avoid a white-on-white colour scheme
  7. Have matte finish tiles to avoid glare
  8. Place toothbrush, toothpaste and shaver in one area, so they can easily be seen.

Set-up your bedroom as a place for quiet contemplation and rest.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Declutter and remove unnecessary items
  2. Place labels on cupboard and draws
  3. Include a night light that activates when the person gets up in the middle of the night
  4. Use plain bed covers rather than a patterned or striped cover
  5. Use bed sheets that contrast with the covers. Avoid using all-white linen and covers
  6. Consider wall-mounted reading lights rather than free-standing lamp shades.

The lounge should be homely with familiar furniture, books and photos.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Remove tripping hazards such as rugs
  2. Have plain, non-patterned carpet or tiles
  3. Use large light switches that contrast with the wall
  4. Have a raised comfortable chair that the person can easily stand from and sit in
  5. Have a sturdy table next to the chair to place books, teacups or remote TV controls
  6. Have plain wallpaper – avoid patterns or stripes
  7. Have games, jigsaw puzzles and photograph albums available for solitary or group entertainment.

 

The kitchen should be functional. Consider having a cooking zone, a supplies area, a washing area, a preparation area and a storage area.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Group regularly used items together, for example, cups, teabags, spoons and milk
  2. Use open shelving or labels on cupboards for regularly used items
  3. Use familiar looking utensils and appliances, for example, a kettle that the person has used in the past
  4. Install a smoke alarm
  5. Have a whiteboard or corkboard with notes and reminders
  6. Refrigerators should have large contrasting handles
  7. Have similar contrast between carpets and tiled areas.

The dining area should be a pleasant and calming place to enjoy meals.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Have contrasting table settings, place mats, tablecloths, plates and cutlery
  2. Consider adaptive cutlery and non-slip placemats
  3. Have open shelving or transparent cupboard doors for crockery and plates
  4. Have diffuse lighting over the dining table that supplements existing lighting
  5. Dining room chairs should have good back and arm supports. Choose material that is durable and easy to clean
  6. Provide meals in stages so the person can concentrate on one course at a time
  7. Avoid distractions such as the TV playing during mealtimes.

Items in your toilets should have contrasting features, so they are easily seen and used.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Install slip-resistant flooring or tiles
  2. Use a contrasting toilet seat
  3. Have familiar and clear ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ cross head taps
  4. Avoid a white-on-white colour scheme
  5. Have matte finish tiles to avoid glare.

 

The laundry can be modified to allow people with dementia to easily continue doing everyday tasks.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Choose simple and familiar appliances
  2. Label or colour code the washing machine and dryer
  3. Have open shelving to allow for quick and easy location of items
  4. Have an ironing board and clothes basket nearby to prompt daily activities
  5. Have an overflow drain or water level alarm on the sink.

 

You can improve the way people navigate the hall way by incorporating simple ideas.

Consider the following dementia-friendly changes:

  1. Use a D shape door handle that contrasts to the door to ease access
  2. Contrast the colour of doors to surrounding walls
  3. Consider painting the architraves or door frame a contrasting colour
  4. Consider symbols or photographs to indicate the function of the room
  5. Use either Arial or Helvetica fonts for door signage. Place signage at 1.2 metre height so they can be easily seen.
  6. Ensure contrast in light sockets. You can also put coloured tape around the switch to assist with identification.